Jump to content

Japanese Rail Car Nomenclature (KuHa, SaHa, MoHa, KiHa)


Recommended Posts

I've seen some EMUs and/or trainsets with coaches described as:

 

KUHA or KUHANE

SAHA or SAHANE

MOHA or MOHANE

KURO

SAROHANE

 

etc...

 

What does all this mean?

Link to post
CaptOblivious

I keep thinking I should sticky a post describing these, as it's a very common question, and a big source of confusion for the uninitiated. In other words: An excellent question!

 

JR uses a series of syllables to describe their cars. Here's a small sampling used for MU's

some prefixes:

MO = electric motor powered car

SA = trailer car

KU = trailer cab car

KI = diesel-powered car

 

some suffixes:

HA = regular class

RO = green class

NE = sleeper accomodations

 

I'll post a fuller list a little later, but this should help you for now!

  • Like 3
Link to post
Claude_Dreyfus

I keep thinking I should sticky a post describing these, as it's a very common question, and a big source of confusion for the uninitiated. In other words: An excellent question!

 

JR uses a series of syllables to describe their cars. Here's a small sampling used for MU's

some prefixes:

MO = electric motor powered car

SA = trailer car

KU = trailer cab car

KI = diesel-powered car

 

some suffixes:

HA = regular class

RO = green class

NE = sleeper accomodations

 

I'll post a fuller list a little later, but this should help you for now!

 

 

 

 

Thanks for posing the question....

 

If you could make this a 'sticky' that would be very useful. As you say, I have seen queries of this nature in the past and a reference of this would be much appreciated. :)

Link to post

I keep thinking I should sticky a post describing these, as it's a very common question, and a big source of confusion for the uninitiated. In other words: An excellent question!

 

JR uses a series of syllables to describe their cars. Here's a small sampling used for MU's

some prefixes:

MO = electric motor powered car

SA = trailer car

KU = trailer cab car

KI = diesel-powered car

 

some suffixes:

HA = regular class

RO = green class

NE = sleeper accomodations

 

I'll post a fuller list a little later, but this should help you for now!

 

LOL, you've said that before about posting that full list :D

Link to post

DMUs

 

Ki = Diesel multiple unit

 

Ha  - Standard class car

 

Ro -  Green class car

 

Shi  - Catering car

 

 

EMUs

 

KuMo  - motor car with cab

 

Mo  - motor car (intermediate car)

 

Ku  - trailer car with cab

 

Sa  - trailer car (intermediate car)

 

Ha  - Standard class car

 

Ro -  Green class car

 

Shi  - Catering car

 

Ne - Sleeping car

 

Ni - Luggage car

 

Yu - Mail car

 

Ya - Departmental/inspection car

 

E - Emergency car

 

Ru - Supply car

 

 

LOCO - HAULED STOCK

Car Weight

 

Ko - Less than 22.5t

 

Ho- 22.5 - 27.5t

 

Na - 27.5 - 32.5t

 

O - 32.5 - 37.5t

 

Su - 37.5 - 42.5t

 

Ma - 42.5 - 47.5t

 

Ka - Over 47.5t

 

Ha - Standard class car (formerly third class)

 

Ro - Green class car (formerly second class)

 

I - First class car

 

Shi - Catering car

 

Ne - Sleeping car

 

Te - Observation car

 

Fu - Brake car (with guard's/conductor's compartment)

 

Ni - Luggage car

 

Yu - Mail car

 

Ya - Departmental/inspection car

 

E - Emergency car

 

Ru - Supply car

 

Freight car designations will follow, as soon as I find my list!  :)

 

Cheers,

 

Mark.

  • Like 10
Link to post

Thanks, Mark! That's really useful.

 

But if i try to memorize it, I'll end up walking around muttering "kumo - mo - so - ha - ro - she - ne - ni - yu...." and they'll lock me up.

 

Is the first car of the Sunrise Express a kumorone?

Link to post
CaptOblivious

Plaza Japan has kindly posted to the web a detailed and easy to read explanation of the various rail car nomenclature systems! Never wonder what an OHANEFU, KOKI, or KUMORO means ever again!

 

http://sunny-life.net/train_symbol/trainsymbol.htm

 

And, if you encounter a name written in Japanese characters, you will find this handy:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Katakana

 

Now you know オハネフ, コキ, and クモロ now too!

  • Like 3
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
CaptOblivious

 

Now I'll spend hours coming up with weird combinations like KUMOSIRONE.

 

That's a hell of a car: A motorized cab car with a dining room and first-class sleepers!

Link to post

A motorized cab car with a dining room and first-class sleepers!

Whatchu think?

 

I like it! And I wouldn't be surprised if something like this gets built, either.

 

Cheers,

 

Mark.

Link to post

KuMoShiNeNiYuITe.....

 

My perfect railcar!!!

 

Motorized cab car with catering, sleeping, luggage, mail, First Class with observation!!!!!

 

Now I gotta build one!  :cool:

 

 

    underworld

Link to post

I ran across one of these not mentioned above, although it is briefly mentioned in the japaneserailwaysociety.com page: DEHA (デハ), which is apparently an old pre-JNR equivalent for MOHA (motor car, normal class) still used "by some private railways" (I could only find references to its use by the Tokyu Corporation, but I didn't try too hard).

 

Does anyone know if "DE" is short for some word, and if so what? Given the Japanese tendency to form short terms from the first phoneme of words in a phrase I'd be inclined to think so, but I don't speak/read Japanese, so I could easily be wrong.

 

See:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/T%C5%8Dky%C5%AB_8500_series

 

and

 

http://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E5%9B%BD%E9%89%84%E3%83%87%E3%83%8F63100%E7%B3%BB%E9%9B%BB%E8%BB%8A

Link to post
bikkuri bahn
Does anyone know if "DE" is short for some word, and if so what

 

Yes, "DE" is short for dendosha(electric powered vehicle).  As you note, the "HA" is short for normal class (i.e. third class before 1960).

Link to post
CaptOblivious

KenS: Good point! Don't forget the tiny little デキ locos!

 

What about some older electric trains that go simply by モ? Obviously they are motorized (the model I have isn't even an MU), but why no suffix indicating class or weight?

Link to post

Thanks, Mark! That's really useful.

 

But if i try to memorize it, I'll end up walking around muttering "kumo - mo - so - ha - ro - she - ne - ni - yu...." and they'll lock me up.

 

Is the first car of the Sunrise Express a kumorone?

According to Wikipedia, the end cars are KuHaNe.  The middle is a SaRoHaNe, however, and that's pretty cool.  :cool:

Link to post

 

HET stands for "Hokkaido Express Train", basically a marketing term used by JR Hokkaido for their 183 series ltd. express diesel trainsets.

Link to post

anyone able to tell me what l/c means??

 

examples

 

http://www.1999.co.jp/eng/10115536

http://www.1999.co.jp/eng/10156194

 

l/c is the Kintetsu designation for rolling stock with dual seat capability.  The seats have automatic rotating mechanisms which can change seats either to cross seating or longitidinal seating, or just changing the direction of seating at the terminal.

  • Like 3
Link to post
  • Densha changed the title to Japanese Rail Car Nomenclature (KuHa, SaHa, MoHa, KiHa)

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...