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CaptOblivious

So you want to try Tomix FineTrack?

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While looking at that second link I came across the EasyTram stuff. That looks pretty promising.

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CaptOblivious

Two new EX Basic Sets were announced recently. No. 90152 includes a 0-series shinkansen, and No. 90153 includes a JNR DD51 and three OHA 61-series passenger cars and several WAMU 80000 boxcars.

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Sushi Train

Ah crap, you've now got me interested in Fine Track, I like the variety in the extras. Gee, thanks a lot guys!  >:(

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Mudkip Orange

It was pointed out on Trainboard that the Kato "snap track adapter piece" is actually a Tomix adapter piece. So conceivably one could have a dual-oval of finetrack, then switch to Unitrack on one side for station locations and whatnot...

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CaptOblivious

It was pointed out on Trainboard that the Kato "snap track adapter piece" is actually a Tomix adapter piece. So conceivably one could have a dual-oval of finetrack, then switch to Unitrack on one side for station locations and whatnot...

 

It would be tricky, I think, but possible…

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C62

Why should it be tricky? Whith adapter track and variable length track its plug and play.

 

Thomas

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Mudkip Orange

Well I just noticed that with the current exchange rates, the Tomix doublecrossover is a full 10 dollars cheaper than Kato's... and the 541mm point is 5 bucks cheaper than Kato's #4 with all the weird fitter pieces...

 

Hmmm...

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alpineaustralia
I believe that Kato also makes a piece of track that converts from Unitrack to Finetrack, so you can actually use both on 1 layout as well.

 

It is a small (peice that connects unitrack on one side with normal rail on the other to allow, Atlas, Peco, Tomix etc etc.

Described by Kato as 62mm (2 7/16") Snap-Track® Conversion Track [1 pc]. Snap-Track® is a trademark of Atlas Model Railroad Co.

Item No. is 20-045 (MRP US$2.50)

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Mudkip Orange

In my recent layout designs I've taken to just using whatever track works best.

 

I still default to Kato, partly because Tomix platforms look like poo, partly because I like the closer track spacing (33 vs 37 mm). But I think there's some room for Tomix adapter tracks, most the completely-selective 280mm switches which allow you to make a nice little "wye" to send out trains in either direction.

 

I also figured out how to make a double-track "wye" using the tomix 280mm turnouts... will post here when I detail it out.

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veejo

I wanted to get Tomix, but being in Australia it's impossible to get, unless you import it yourself.

My outlay on Kato so far is 2 ovals (inner and outer), no crossings, staions, or expensive bits yet, only invested abour $120 AU ($100 US) in track. I keep thinking, "go tomix", but I know if I need some track for the weekend, it will be 2 weeks before I see it from Japan, 3 days mail order Australia, possiblity from the local train shop on the day.

 

I'm still considerig the tomix, but unless you read Japanese it's hard to get info in it. Kato, there is English info available from KATO USA, abd some infor from dealer sites.

 

The other big adavanatge of Tomix track is FIT. I was at a train show and some N guage entusiats showed me the difference in track between kato and tomix. If you run your finger nail across tomix track, you can't feel where the tracks join, it's perfectly smooth. If you do the same with Kato, you can feel the joins. When you run trains on Tomix, you don't get the "click" where tracks join. Smoother ride and no noise for those REALLY into scaling.

 

Tomix catalogue in English, that would be WAY cool. Tomix dealer with stock in Australia, that would be heaven.

 

The posting and GIFs on this thread might make me take the plunge to Tomix and I know  more about it.

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Mudkip Orange

but unless you read Japanese it's hard to get info in it.

The Philly N-scalers have a handy dandy comparison page, you can check it out:

 

http://www.trainweb.org/tomix/track/TomixTrackSystems.htm

 

Basically, the Tomix and Kato systems are VERY similar. The main difference is turnouts. Kato turnouts have longer, larger radii - a "long" Kato turnout is R718mm, while a "short" is R481mm - contrast this with Tomix, where a "long" turnout is R541mm and a "short" turnout is actually 280.

 

Tomix also has the "mini-rail" tram-type curves, which are compatible with the rest of the setup, but they're too tight for regular trains.

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Tenorikuma

Are you sure most Japanese trains can't navigate Tomix's Mini-Rail curves? I assumed they simply looked unprototypical for anything but trams. I tried out my Tomix 7000 on the tightest Kato track (216-mm radius) and my impression was that even much tighter curves would be no problem.

 

Also, Tomix's curve-on-curve turnouts seem really useful for small layout planning.

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disturbman

Are you sure most Japanese trains can't navigate Tomix's Mini-Rail curves? I assumed they simply looked unprototypical for anything but trams. I tried out my Tomix 7000 on the tightest Kato track (216-mm radius) and my impression was that even much tighter curves would be no problem.

 

Don't know about that but I do know that my Tomix Kihas can't handle european tighter radius (~194mm). They can run alone but put together in a consist the cars bounce into each others.

 

Also, Tomix's curve-on-curve turnouts seem really useful for small layout planning.

 

Yeah but it's not unusual to see train derail on curve-on-curve turnouts. I know I can't use so much my Fleischmann's curve-on-curve.

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CaptOblivious

No link handy, but there's a guy on YouTube who runs various rolling stock through the Mini and Super Mini curves to test them. Surprisingly many trains will pass…

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disturbman

Yes, I have seen some today. I don't have any link either but I do remember that his username was just a random series of numbers starting with a 1.

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bill937ca

Yes, I have seen some today. I don't have any link either but I do remember that his username was just a random series of numbers starting with a 1.

 

It's not a random series of numbers, but the three tightest radius of Tomix track.

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Martijn Meerts

Wow, he used quite a few tram track accessory kits there =)

 

I actually have a few of all those curves as well, most locomotives have problems with them..

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disturbman

Yes, I have seen some today. I don't have any link either but I do remember that his username was just a random series of numbers starting with a 1.

 

It's not a random series of numbers, but the three tightest radius of Tomix track.

 

At first, all series of numbers seems random. But now that I now the meaning I can memorized it and recognize it. Anyway the videos are great.

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scott

So, I'm considering adding a tram line (just a single back-and-forth, nothing fancy) to our layout, since I have one tram (Enoden 300) and another is on order (Portram). Looks like FineTrack would be a better choice, due to the tighter radii and the pre-made paving sections.

 

Which leads to a couple of questions:

 

* Are articulated trams likely to be OK on the 103mm radius? (The 300 is two regular-size cars, with three trucks, one between the cars. The Toyama of course is articulated with one truck in each section.)

* Is it any easier to get FineTrack in the US yet?

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disturbman

To you first question, you should check 170140103's video, a youtube user, I'm pretty sure he has the answer to your question. :)

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scott

Great--thanks. Knowing that will save me a lot of time...

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Tenorikuma

Here's a useful link if you want to know whether your tram will work on Tomix's mini and super-mini curves:

http://joshinweb.jp/hobby/minirail1.html?ACK=TOKU

 

The trains tested are a B-train Shorty, a Kiha 120, a Tokyu 300, an Enoden 300, an Enoden 600, and the "Kirara" 900. I found it while doing a search to see if the Kirara could handle 140 mm curves (it can). Interestingly, they found that the Enoden 300 does not pass the 103 mm curves, while the Tokyu version does, owing to the fact that it is 7 mm shorter.

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scott

Thanks--yeah, that's the same Enoden 300 that we have.

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