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Come Back Any Time--Ramen documentary


bill937ca

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bill937ca

I have just become aware that Hot Docs a Toronto based documentary festival is airing a Ramen documentary for a limited time. The World  Premierei s today - April 29th    Streaming in Canada from April 29th to May 9th. Tickets $13. Not sure if this works outside Canada.

 

Trailer for the documentary COME BACK ANYTIME. Experience a year in the life of self-taught Tokyo ramen master Masamoto Ueda, who considers his legendary ramen shop more than just a livelihood but his life, and his die-hard customers more than just regulars, but true friends.

 

https://boxoffice.hotdocs.ca/websales/pages/info.aspx?evtinfo=141649~367cbc04-eb03-453a-90f8-88ca48c4cf79&epguid=9759e3f1-085c-4e15-88c2-e02a8ee1f1d1&

 

Although I find the price a bit of a downer, there is a free You Tube trailer.

 

 

Edited by bill937ca
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oh man big time homer drool... Looks sweet. yeah, but beats the like $18 here most places in theaters that will show more cultural stuff.

 

i may suggest this to the JICC for a screening here at their little theater. then will have to find a ramen place to go to afterwards. 

 

Sadly the new ramen shop nearby didnt make it thru lockdowns. but they didnt do the thinner toyko style broth, thiers were all pretty thick and heavy and a bit too much for my tastes. i may have to get off my ass and get into cooking some of my own.

 

cheers

 

jeff

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bill937ca
Posted (edited)

I watched it. It's 82 minutes fully in Japanese, with full sub-titles.  He has a little Ramen shop in Tokyo, grows vegetables and fruit in what might be a back yard garden, has a pear farm and grows yams in the mountains. His Ramen shop has been open for 40 years.  It looks amazing to our eyes but this is not the first Ramen shop documentary I've seen. Its a world of difference from the West.  I will watch it again during my 48 hours. Five stars.

Edited by bill937ca
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Nice bit of cheers thrown in. Japanese film is good at bringing in subtle interpersonal dynamics into social situations like this, it’s not overdone, but you can feel it nicely under the larger cultural overtones. Lots revolve around a small eating establishments! 
 

jeff

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