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Modular scenery and layout levels


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gavino200

I'm thinking about how to organize the surface of my layout. A few years ago I saw on 'Tokio in n scale' how buildings can be inset into a slot in the layout to get them to a more realistic level than the Tomytec (or other maker) bases they come with. I asked about it here and learned about foamboard and styrene sheets. I pick up some different thicknesses ages ago but never got round to using them. 

 

I'd like to make my scenery modular. Two reasons. One is that I can remove them to work on them. The other is that I could potentially disassemble the layout without destroying it. 

 

So, for example, a building with a parking lot. The parking lot would come out in one piece. Within the parking lot there'd be a recess where the building would go. 

 

Theres a similar situation with track on trackbed, though ballasting sort of hides the issue for the most part, but maybe not always. Definitely not when using Kato Unitrack or Tomix Finetrack. 

 

Basically it's as if the pink foam base (or plywood) is the bedrock, and this extra thickness is the topsoil. What I need to decide is how thick this "topsoil" level needs to be. The material thickness I have are as follows:

 

PVC 6 mm or maybe 1/8 inch

5mm acrylic

3 mm woodland scenic foam

2 mm foamboard

1 mm styrene sheets. 

 

It seems like a 5 or 6 mm "Topsoil" level will work. 

 

As for material, something like foam board would be ideal, as it's easy enough to cut into to inset new structures into later as necessary. 

 

ygwubZC.jpg

 

Large structures like a station may be a special case. I'm going to cut to a new post to describe it. 

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gavino200

I'm going to post a few pictures of my station. It isn't actually built yet. Basically it's an enlargement of my previous station. I have pictures of the old station and plans for the new station. 

 

This is the old station. It's illuminated. The LED wires make it fairly complicated to remove. 

 

BYMSLaH.jpg

 

This is from a time when I took it apart to detail it and improve the lighting. You can see that the wires are a real mess. It wasn't simple to remove this. 

 

GZLnbdE.jpg

 

The new station will be similar but will have three island platforms and will be one platform length longer. 

 

RtLFaPO.jpg

 

y79zyDr.jpg

 

This is the trackplan for the new station. 

 

iexGf8v.jpg

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gavino200

My goals are: 

 

1. To make the platforms and station easier to work on. I'd like to be able to removed them. 

2. To simplify the wiring to allow the for removal of the structures. Also, I'd like to have the circuitry to be removable from under the board so that I can make adjustments while able to see the station. Before I had all the potentiometers (dimmer switches) on the underside of the layout. That make it a nightmare and/or a two person job to adjust them. 

 

Potential solutions. 

1. Lots of small connectors, so that each small unit, like the station house or a single platform can be removed. I'm leaning toward this as I write. 

2. Make the entire station on a sheet of PVC so that it could be removed as a unit.

3. Make the entire station on two or three sheets of PCV to be removed in a few pieces. 

4. Make the Station footprint and tracks a permanent fixture on the board with lift out platforms and station houses. 

 

The main potential problem with making the whole station "lift out" is that it's large and the segment would become very flexible. To be rigid enough it may need to be quite thick. 

 

 

In any case, I'd like for the wires would lead to a removable circuit (inobu style) that cold be placed under the board but could be removed to work on. I could potentially use something like these old computer connectors to make the allow facilitate removal of the circuits. 

 

Fh6oMfp.jpg

Edited by gavino200
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As I cannot easily work on my layout (which lives in a drawer 😀https://shin-yukari.weebly.com/layout-description.html), I build (almost) everything as removable modules that can be moved to my desk whenever I want to work on them. At least, this is the idea, not always easy to reach.

These are a few modules that are on my desk today: 

 

IMG_2979.thumb.jpeg.0066c10ca8fb8f6760d3d12ae35fb6d8.jpeg

 

IMG_2980.thumb.jpeg.7a860ada2a4aff53295741b5d2c36da9.jpeg

 

IMG_2981.thumb.jpeg.267c4736a87ca6cee7bda1c65d79e950.jpeg

 

IMG_2969.thumb.jpeg.3806bfd527bb45778920aad1ebbf6ab4.jpeg

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Martijn Meerts

Definitely interesting to see what suggestions people come up with on this. I definitely want to go with a modular scenery approach as well, but often it's real easy to see where the modules have been placed in the layout, since you can see the outline and / or gaps and such.

 

My idea for structures at least, is to have all the LEDs and wiring and whatnot contained in the structure, and have a single connector to hook it up to the layout. The connector will depend on how many individually controlled LEDs the structure has. Under the layout, the other part of the connector will be wired to a device that can control the LEDs (likely an OC32). I might use some small magnets to keep the buildings in place.

 

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Modular has always been my approach where possible as I have stuff we have used on the club layouts, Ttrak and then I want to of course use at home!   So over the years I’ve spend a large amount of time thinking and playing with substrates, physical and electrical connections, led dimming, and if to standardize scenery base sizes. Our early club layout were all set up on the fly so any scenery we did there had to be small modules of drop in scenery. When I was a kid I had about what ended up a t a 3.5’x7’ layout and I learned quickly I hated trying to add small details to structures and scenes that were in the middle of the layout so even then I ended up doing some things in hard to reach places (like my roundhouse) as a larger scenery module that just dropped into place. Barry Lovell’s article on mini scenery bases and scenes brought over from wargaming really locked me into this was the way to go on most of my main detailing efforts!

 

I’ve talked a lot about bits and pieces of all this on the forum over they years so I thought this would be a good place to summarize it. Hopefully this year I want to write it all up as an article and do a good series of pictures illustrating it all.

 

I have a set of Ttrak modules I hope to have done for the fall when shows hopefully start up again and this will be my first attempt at doing scenery modules with lighting and connections on a bigger scale as it will have a lot of buildings and don’t want to sink that amount of money to just using on Ttrak.

 

Substrate

for smaller stuff I think I’m sticking with 2mm palight (foamed pvc) as it’s pretty flat and stiff but easy to cut and lighter than styrene sheet or acrylic.

 

An aside, one of the substrates we used for base material on the early club setups was Formica of all things. We were looking for something thin and stiff that would stay flat over areas up to 2’ long and in odd shapes. I was using Formica for the top surface of the station bases (perfect thickness and stiffness and homedespot had a granite pattern that was spot on to kato roadbed!) and realized it fit the bill. They held up very well a couple got warped by bad storing and some heat was able to get it flat again. It’s super rugged stuff (basically fiberglass) and the thinnest you can go for something flat, stiff, and tough. But it’s nasty to cut. 
 

Affixing and Locating Buildings and Modules

Over the years I’ve become a huge fan of using tiny neodymium magnets to hold stuff down. Used in pairs even the tiny 2mmx1mm ones give quite a grip. They are pretty cheap at a cent or two each when bought in bulk. It’s been the best way to hold buildings down, every time I’ve glued a building, even with just little tacks of PVA that are easily popped off, I need to pull the building for some reason or another and that’s usually with out it being lit! Lighting requires multiple rounds of fiddling with the building off the layout to finalize all the light sealing, dimming and such. I just glue 2-4 of the 1mmx2mm or 1mmx3mm onto the bottom of the structure at strategic places. Many tomytec building have nice recesses to do this in. I glue them to the building base with a very small dab of super glue. Once dry, just pop an other magnet on each glued magnet then you can drop another drop of super glue or PVA onto the top magnet and then drop the building in place. Once dry it’s locked in and just twist and pull to pop it off. Repeat the second new layer of magnets if you want to locate the building on something else.


LED Control

Power and control connections for leds is a big pain in the butt. If you have a few leds you want to control remotely then of course you need lots of wires and a bunch of pins in your connectors and that just starts making connectors larger. I’ve been messing with this for years wanting a really working on solution for my needs before I do the work of lighting a ton of buildings. I want a system.
 

I’ve decided I don’t want to worry about controlling lighting remotely other than turn them all or in large zones) on or off or perhaps increase or decrease the buss voltage for day and night. Lighting buildings in the day is actually cool (most building have their internal lights on during the day!) but at scale to get the right effect you usually need the lights brighter than at night at scale. I’ve not played with this extensively to know how specific it is to a particular building, but I’ve given up being that perfect and will settle for a universal boost. I’m more concerned about individual leds in a building getting tuned just right for that building at night when lighting effect is the most striking and can really go wrong or really shine! Pun intended...
 

So my approach is just bring 5v power buss to the scenery module and then have micro pots in the buildings to dim leds in each spot in the scene to the right level. This requires hiding the pots in the structure but still having access holes to adjust them. Thing does get a bit fiddly, but in my tests it seems to work fine.
 

My current approach is a simple pcb breadboard to solder component to. Each circuit is just a 100 ohm resistor (just a limiting resistor to drop the 5v to 3v so if the variable resistor is at 0 it won’t blow the led) and a variable resistor (pot). I have played with using a single strip of an IC socket along the edge to just shove the led and power wire leads into instead of having to solder them to the board. At some point I will probably end up doing a little custom pcb to solder pot, resistor, led leads, and power feed to and just have it modular so I can cut it off at the needed number of dimmer circuits needed. This would be easy if the PCB is done on the flexible Mylar backing instead of the fiberglass and the IC strip could stiffen it and it can also act as a mounting point. For the whole board to the structure.

 

Eventually I would love to replace the little dimmer circuit with the ATtiny chip, basically like a simple adurino nano on a chip. It’s super small and various sizes to control from 4 to 12 I/o connections to turn on and off and even dim (with pwm) leds. With this you could also program some of the lights to randomly turn on and off to animate the lighting. Theoretically you could also create a serial buss to individually control and coordinate chips remotely! It’s the pipe dream, but within reach as it’s all pretty much there now and Uber cheap. But will take me some time to get to that point, but I should not be hard to just swap the analog board with the attiny one. Again modular does the trick!

 

Power Connections or Connectors, Connectors, Who Needs Stinkin Connectors!

So I’ve had this issue since I was a kid of what’s the easiest and smallest way to bring power to things and still have it easy to disconnect. I think I’ve tried every kind of micro connectors out there! Even the smallest are bulky and the smaller they are the harder the are to connect and disconnect. then you have to make sure the wire is firmly attached to the structure/base so your lights don’t get ripped out if the wire is tugged on (and this will happen) plus you have to be able to pull the connector thru a hole big enough to easily pull it thru (and their edges live to get hung up in this process a lot without really big holes). Then when you got to put the structure/base back in place you have to snake the wires and connector into the hole as you place the structure. Plus then under the layout you have all these loops of spare wire hanging down for the slack to be able to pull the building up far enough to disconnect the connector. The  also you need to be able to have enough slack wire to lay the building down in a good spot around it’s location as you need 2 hands to disconnect most all connectors and even then it can be a challenge at 2’ out with arms outstretched and working around other structures and details in the area! Not a fun process at times I found starting when I was a kid on my first layout!
 

We had these issues big time on our early club layouts of setting up layouts on the fly and changing things to how to easily bring power and point feeds thru the 1” extruded foam we were using as our layout base in the smallest hole possible. Kato connectors require quite a big hole and we didn’t want the module bases to become Swiss cheese as we evolved the set up on the fly layout. Most all connectors out there that were smaller also had a lot of corners and such that really loved to get snagged on the rough foam insides of the holes. You can use straws to try to get around this but was just a pain as again most were not a whole lot smaller than Kato connectors. So finally I just used simple serial cable pin connectors (that usually plugs into the big old serial cable connectors of days gone by) and used no housing around them, I just covered them in color coded heat shrink. These were great as they could carry a couple of amps and crimp and solder easily to 20g (and even 18g) wire and were only like 3mm in diameter and super fast and cheap to build (like 2 cents a pair)! One other issue they helped was with most connectors once connected if you end up snagging a wire and yank on it you will usually rip the wire out something before the connector gives way even if they don’t lock! With us setting up on the fly and going under the layout a lot it was easy to snag wires like this and the serial pins got around this as the pulled apart before the wire got ripped out of anything!

 

Well all that was to say I’m sick of connectors! Connectors, connectors, who needs stinkin connectors! So I use the base magnets as the power connectors. The tiny neodymium magnets are usually coated in nickel silver (I always source the shiny silver ones) so very nice conduction interface between the magnets with no real voltage loss. My first attempts I just soldered the wires to the edge of the magnet. This works but you need to be fast on the soldering as if heated too much they will loose their magnetic field polarity. It works but you ruin some and it was a pain to deal with the attached wire while trying to glue the magnets in place. It’s up there with the tedium of soldering your own leads onto 0603 SMD leds or buying the more wired! 
 

So I looked at conductive glue, it’s got tiny silver particles in it and creates a joint that’s pretty conductive, tiny voltage loss but no issue here. It’s not strong glue but it only needs to make the electrical connection you can the  add some epoxy or ca glue to hold the wire firmly in place so no strain on the conductive joint. All you need do is lay a stripped wire (I use 30g wrapping wire that’s tinned stranded wire so tough and small and can carry decent amperage for its size) end next to the magnet that’s been glued in place and then just glue it to the edge of the magnet with a small dab of conductive glue. Then jus add a dab of epoxy or ca glue on the wire at the insulation to hold it in place and take any strain off the conductive glue (it’s not a super strong joint). Makes running wires a lot easier as well.

 

After some of our  discussions on conductive glues I decided to try a new approach to attach the wires to the glued down magnets. So looking at the magnet to wire issue it dawned on me that there is a very simple solution that does not require the conductive glue! I just stripped about 15mm of my 30g wire and wrapped it once around a 1.8mm rod and then twisted it several times to make a nice little eyeloop at the end of the wire. Then just pressure fitted it over the glued magnet. It holds really well and great electrical contact. Then just a dot of thick ca glue or epoxy at the twisted bit to lock it down! The once glue is dry drill a convenient hole and snake the lead thru. Really is faster and easier than trying to loop the wire along the edge of the magnet and then conductive glue it and no messy conductive glue tomess with! I expect I could make a ton of these loop leads in an evening watching tv, then super fast to slip on around a glued magnet andglue wire.

 

I love it when solutions get simpler!

 

3A3B5C97-5615-4C28-A6A7-2445806554BB.jpeg

 

Magnetic connectors can be use to bring power from layout base to the scenery base and also from the scenery base to the buildings. I fiddled with just running 30g buss wire (tinned solid core wire with out insulation like the leads on a resistor very tin and easy to bend) by routing some channels in the palight with the roto tool and a router collar. Simple and easy as you don’t need to strip the wires as the base will insulate everything, just tack the buss wire in place with ca glue. You can just run the buss wires past the edges of the magnets to run power to multiple building on a scenery module. With this one thing I’m standardizing on is to put one power lead in the front of the module and one in the back so you can easily wire a string of buildings on a scenery module and keeping a standard polarity.

 

Modularizing Scenery Base Sizes

Paul Ingraham has a great system for his scenery modules for his AsiaN rail modules where he has standardized his scenery base plate sizes to a few specific sizes so he can do a lot of mixing and matching. He uses a magnet and a washer to help hold the modules down and using a magnet to a washer he had a little play in where the building can lock in. It’s really neat and has worked well for his multiple modular layouts tha can change from Japanese to North American etc easily! Early on I thought of going this route of making things very modular as Ttrak usually has more uniform sized areas you can plop things on and many of the tomytec building I have fall into a few fairly standard sized and even kato sort of did their bases at standardized sizes for their diotown and unitram systems. But I’ve slowly decided to be a bit more relaxed on it as I’m mainly moving the scene between Ttrak, club and home situations and don’t think I’ll be scrambling things that much. That being said, Paul has got me back to thinking more on doing some more standardization where I can now. I’m going to look at using a few standard sizes for scenery bases when I can and same with building placement on scenery modules. Many of the small tomytec shops are very close in base size so I’m now planning on using a little template to hold the building base magnets at a specific depth back from the front and centered in the side to side of the building base. This way I hope I can do scenery modules or maybe a short block of shops but then be able to move the order of the shops around. 
 

Anyhow I’m glad the lighting issues kept me working on these concepts as they have all kind of gelled for me now on what I want and need to do and it feels right. My eventual more permanent home layout is still a moving target for me but we have a lot more Ttrak going on now with the club and our eventual new club layout is designed for a lot of dense scenes which could be fun to do this way and share my scenery modules ar first until the club eventually would create their own for the club layout, it also then makes the club layout more flexible into the future as we have changed layouts every 6-7 years. We also face a big challenge with our big club layouts of space to set them up to work on things and also just schedule times to do communal work is really a hard issue. The more things we can pull off the layout for stuff folks can work on at home and potentially havre part time with the club until the club buys their own buildings and scenery details for a scene the better. Folks can put in more quality time at home in their own schedule than with communal work.
 

cheers

 

jeff

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gavino200
1 hour ago, cteno4 said:

 


LED Control

Power and control connections for leds is a big pain in the butt. If you have a few leds you want to control remotely then of course you need lots of wires and a bunch of pins in your connectors and that just starts making connectors larger. I’ve been messing with this for years wanting a really working on solution for my needs before I do the work of lighting a ton of buildings. I want a system.
 

I’ve decided I don’t want to worry about controlling lighting remotely other than turn them all or in large zones) on or off or perhaps increase or decrease the buss voltage for day and night. Lighting buildings in the day is actually cool (most building have their internal lights on during the day!) but at scale to get the right effect you usually need the lights brighter than at night at scale. I’ve not played with this extensively to know how specific it is to a particular building, but I’ve given up being that perfect and will settle for a universal boost. I’m more concerned about individual leds in a building getting tuned just right for that building at night when lighting effect is the most striking and can really go wrong or really shine! Pun intended...
 

So my approach is just bring 5v power buss to the scenery module and then have micro pots in the buildings to dim leds in each spot in the scene to the right level. This requires hiding the pots in the structure but still having access holes to adjust them. Thing does get a bit fiddly, but in my tests it seems to work fine.
 

My current approach is a simple pcb breadboard to solder component to. Each circuit is just a 100 ohm resistor (just a limiting resistor to drop the 5v to 3v so if the variable resistor is at 0 it won’t blow the led) and a variable resistor (pot). I have played with using a single strip of an IC socket along the edge to just shove the led and power wire leads into instead of having to solder them to the board. At some point I will probably end up doing a little custom pcb to solder pot, resistor, led leads, and power feed to and just have it modular so I can cut it off at the needed number of dimmer circuits needed. This would be easy if the PCB is done on the flexible Mylar backing instead of the fiberglass and the IC strip could stiffen it and it can also act as a mounting point. For the whole board to the structure.

 

Eventually I would love to replace the little dimmer circuit with the ATtiny chip, basically like a simple adurino nano on a chip. It’s super small and various sizes to control from 4 to 12 I/o connections to turn on and off and even dim (with pwm) leds. With this you could also program some of the lights to randomly turn on and off to animate the lighting. Theoretically you could also create a serial buss to individually control and coordinate chips remotely! It’s the pipe dream, but within reach as it’s all pretty much there now and Uber cheap. But will take me some time to get to that point, but I should not be hard to just swap the analog board with the attiny one. Again modular does the trick!

 

This is great. Would you mind making a pencil sketch diagram of the circuits you're thinking of and adding a photo of the sketches? 

 

 

1 hour ago, cteno4 said:

 

Power Connections or Connectors, Connectors, Who Needs Stinkin Connectors!

So I’ve had this issue since I was a kid of what’s the easiest and smallest way to bring power to things and still have it easy to disconnect. I think I’ve tried every kind of micro connectors out there! Even the smallest are bulky and the smaller they are the harder the are to connect and disconnect. then you have to make sure the wire is firmly attached to the structure/base so your lights don’t get ripped out if the wire is tugged on (and this will happen) plus you have to be able to pull the connector thru a hole big enough to easily pull it thru (and their edges live to get hung up in this process a lot without really big holes). Then when you got to put the structure/base back in place you have to snake the wires and connector into the hole as you place the structure. Plus then under the layout you have all these loops of spare wire hanging down for the slack to be able to pull the building up far enough to disconnect the connector. The  also you need to be able to have enough slack wire to lay the building down in a good spot around it’s location as you need 2 hands to disconnect most all connectors and even then it can be a challenge at 2’ out with arms outstretched and working around other structures and details in the area! Not a fun process at times I found starting when I was a kid on my first layout!
 

We had these issues big time on our early club layouts of setting up layouts on the fly and changing things to how to easily bring power and point feeds thru the 1” extruded foam we were using as our layout base in the smallest hole possible. Kato connectors require quite a big hole and we didn’t want the module bases to become Swiss cheese as we evolved the set up on the fly layout. Most all connectors out there that were smaller also had a lot of corners and such that really loved to get snagged on the rough foam insides of the holes. You can use straws to try to get around this but was just a pain as again most were not a whole lot smaller than Kato connectors. So finally I just used simple serial cable pin connectors (that usually plugs into the big old serial cable connectors of days gone by) and used no housing around them, I just covered them in color coded heat shrink. These were great as they could carry a couple of amps and crimp and solder easily to 20g (and even 18g) wire and were only like 3mm in diameter and super fast and cheap to build (like 2 cents a pair)! One other issue they helped was with most connectors once connected if you end up snagging a wire and yank on it you will usually rip the wire out something before the connector gives way even if they don’t lock! With us setting up on the fly and going under the layout a lot it was easy to snag wires like this and the serial pins got around this as the pulled apart before the wire got ripped out of anything!

 

Well all that was to say I’m sick of connectors! Connectors, connectors, who needs stinkin connectors! So I use the base magnets as the power connectors. The tiny neodymium magnets are usually coated in nickel silver (I always source the shiny silver ones) so very nice conduction interface between the magnets with no real voltage loss. My first attempts I just soldered the wires to the edge of the magnet. This works but you need to be fast on the soldering as if heated too much they will loose their magnetic field polarity. It works but you ruin some and it was a pain to deal with the attached wire while trying to glue the magnets in place. It’s up there with the tedium of soldering your own leads onto 0603 SMD leds or buying the more wired! 
 

So I looked at conductive glue, it’s got tiny silver particles in it and creates a joint that’s pretty conductive, tiny voltage loss but no issue here. It’s not strong glue but it only needs to make the electrical connection you can the  add some epoxy or ca glue to hold the wire firmly in place so no strain on the conductive joint. All you need do is lay a stripped wire (I use 30g wrapping wire that’s tinned stranded wire so tough and small and can carry decent amperage for its size) end next to the magnet that’s been glued in place and then just glue it to the edge of the magnet with a small dab of conductive glue. Then jus add a dab of epoxy or ca glue on the wire at the insulation to hold it in place and take any strain off the conductive glue (it’s not a super strong joint). Makes running wires a lot easier as well.

 

Magnetic connectors can be use to bring power from layout base to the scenery base and also from the scenery base to the buildings. I fiddled with just running 30g buss wire (tinned solid core wire with out insulation like the leads on a resistor very tin and easy to bend) by routing some channels in the palight with the roto tool and a router collar. Simple and easy as you don’t need to strip the wires as the base will insulate everything, just tack the buss wire in place with ca glue. You can just run the buss wires past the edges of the magnets to run power to multiple building on a scenery module. With this one thing I’m standardizing on is to put one power lead in the front of the module and one in the back so you can easily wire a string of buildings on a scenery module and keeping a standard polarity.

 

I'm interested in trying this. Especially for my station and platforms. Removing them is a real nightmare, so the work involved will be worth it. I did try conductive glue before, and it was a complete dud. Where did you buy your glue? Can you post a link. I'm interested in trying again. I already have a bunch of magnets, bought for this purpose. 

 

 

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gavino200

I'm going to attempt to make my station somewhat modular. By a longshot, this will not be the easiest set piece to make modular. It's size is perhaps the biggest problem. However, the size and the connectedness of the station and platforms make it the one set piece that would benefit most from modularity. It's a really beast to take apart or remove when fully wired up. 

 

I'm going to try to use Jeffs magnet technique. 

 

I'll try to have the whole station on perhaps three boards that will drop into the layout. I may have to excavate recess in the foam for an oversized module.

 

I'm going to make a separate thread for this in the "other projects" forum. Later, I'll post successful results here, if there are any. 

 

I think the individual platforms will be relatively easy to do. The station pieces will be the main challenge. There are a lot of wires and very limited space under the platforms. These were the first structures that I added LEDs to and my methods were extremely crude. I'm not sure I still have good access to the structures. 

 

GWB6b3M.jpg

 

7ZbfRe1.jpg

 

Pots, connectors and magnets. 

 

A87wnUX.jpg

 

Tiny neodynium magnets

 

oIDxj50.jpg

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heres the basic dimmer circuit i use. i use 5v for the power supply and 100 ohm as the limiting resistor and either 2k or 5k for the trimmer pot. the 100 ohm resistor as the main limiting resistor for the 5v to limit to max of 20ma to the led if the trimmer is turned all the way off so no resistance from it. the trimmer then can do the dimming as desired. you can wire the resistor and trimmer in series or separate on either side of the led if you want, all in how you want to do the components.

 

you could use the same thing and use 2 or 3 leds in series and the appropriate limiting resistor on 12V

 

yeah with platforms really can do all the resistors for various leds and trimmers as needed under the platform and just do a power feed to the platform to run it all.

 

cheers

 

jeff

 

image.pngimage.png

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gavino200

Thanks. I can make that very small by using an SMD resistor and just soldering it onto one of the Pot legs. The main size restriction will be what Pot I use. I have some very small ones but AFAIK you can only adjust them a few times before the wiper wears out. (or something like that). I'll do a review of available potentiometers before deciding on one.

 

Another option for this particular situation (the station building) would be to calculate the exact resistance I need and just place resistors under the platform with no pots. In future I will be able to design proactively to include potentiometers. This job is a bit of a retrofit. 

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JR 500系

Very nice! I might wanna try resisting some power supply on my layout! 

 

It looks great Gavin! That sheer amount of wires is telling me the station looks superb when lighted up ~

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gavino200
7 minutes ago, JR 500系 said:

 

It looks great Gavin! That sheer amount of wires is telling me the station looks superb when lighted up ~

 

It really tells how clueless I was when I did this. It was my first real attempt at adding LEDs.

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