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Inspirational Scenery & Layouts


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This is closer to an all track layout.  This 1800 x 600 mm.  Video by  新快速電車野洲行【Nゲージ鉄道模型.

 

 

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Introducing a layout that allows you to divide and store the double-track layout of the N gauge model railroad. The size when unfolded is about 210 cm x 100 cm, but when storing it, it can be divided into 8 parts so that each side has a maximum of about 60 cm. The layout is based on the image of the JR Kyoto Line (Tokaido Main Line), and runs 223 series Special Rapid Service, 201 series, 207 series ordinary trains, and EF210 freight trains. Each station on the inner line departs and arrives by automatic operation by TNOS.

 

 

Video by 新快速電車野洲行【Nゲージ鉄道模型】

 

 

Edited by bill937ca
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I found this video as part of a blog where I think the guy buys used model trains and repairs them.

 

https://daitaitetsu.info/

 

The scenery isn’t anything fancy or special, but I like the way it’s built on one of those shelving systems. I think this is the first non T-Trak shelf layout I’ve seen from Japan. 

 

 

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bill937ca

A to drool for railway bridge diorama with various trains running. Fully scenery, bridges and overhead.   Video by  長嶋淳一

 

 

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James-SNMB
On 3/28/2021 at 10:02 AM, gavino200 said:

He has lots of interesting buildings. The papercraft buildings look pretty good, I think. There's some serious building glow. It's a pity. Some paint and a few resistors would help. I'm definitely inspired by the organization of his hobby room. Look at all those tiny stacked bins!! It seems like a fun layout. 

 

That's funny, I watched his videos some time ago and when I saw the slight glow of some of the building, I actually had the opposite reaction and realized it didn't bother me much at all, which was a surprise (as I'm getting to that stage right now). I still will work to light block all my buildings, but I can see in his videos how much everything comes to life with light. I may do some quick temporary light installation in some buildings that I can come back to later to finish properly. Let there be light!

 

It also helps that the main person I'm trying to impress is 5 years old...

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38 minutes ago, James-SNMB said:

That's funny, I watched his videos some time ago and when I saw the slight glow of some of the building, I actually had the opposite reaction and realized it didn't bother me much at all, which was a surprise (as I'm getting to that stage right now). I still will work to light block all my buildings, but I can see in his videos how much everything comes to life with light. I may do some quick temporary light installation in some buildings that I can come back to later to finish properly. Let there be light!

 

It also helps that the main person I'm trying to impress is 5 years old...


LOL yes atomic glowing buildings will really impress the 5 year old, but you’ve probably been modeling with them for their whole life so by age 7 they will expect rivet counting detail! 
 

lighting is definitely something that needs a lot of playing with to get just right. It’s not always intuitive and sometimes it’s just trying various things and one just pops way out above the other permutations. I did a lot of lighting in exhibit models and it was stunning when you got it just right, it was like a whole new picture. We had some pros come in a few times to get really nice stuff and it was amazing to watch them work and it was always more lights but subtler than the “blast it” stage lighting. All very subtle as you go smaller and smaller…

 

with lower, subtler lighting from more places you can get away with a lot less internal light shielding as well. It’s the full bur 20ma leds that are the mini Suns melting thru walls.

 

looking forward to what you come up with, lots of 5 year olds here (me included) you can impress!

 

cheers,

 

jeff

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James-SNMB

For sure. It can (and will) be an iterative process. I can't expect to nail it first try, so I might as well throw something out there and see how it looks rather than trying to make it perfect out of the gate. The latter approach would be more in line with my natural character, but it can be restrictive where I'd benefit from a "learn by doing" approach. And l'll have to balance that against the considerations that I'll have to make if "I might have to open this again later" until I get the hang of what works and what doesn't. Lots to think about (my favourite aspect of the hobby, fortunately).

 

Besides, it will be better to stare at (and play with) a layout that's less than perfect than nothing at all. I can always change it later.

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3 hours ago, James-SNMB said:

 

That's funny, I watched his videos some time ago and when I saw the slight glow of some of the building, I actually had the opposite reaction and realized it didn't bother me much at all, which was a surprise (as I'm getting to that stage right now). I still will work to light block all my buildings, but I can see in his videos how much everything comes to life with light. I may do some quick temporary light installation in some buildings that I can come back to later to finish properly. Let there be light!

 

It also helps that the main person I'm trying to impress is 5 years old...

 

Ha, yes I started putting lights in buildings when my son was about five. He's harder to impress now that he's 12. I'm a bit obsessive about this issue myself. I really don't like when my buildings glow, so I try to reduce it as much as possible. I just looked at the video again to see if I was being unfair. I like his layout. It looks fun, and it's clear that he's having a good time with it. But really, many of those buildings glow a lot. The bar is pretty high for these "inspirational layouts". I wouldn't offer criticism this petty if video weren't posted there. I certainly wouldn't put myself at that level. 

 

What works for me for light proofing is black paint. As many coats as it takes to stop glow. Often one coat is enough. Then a coat of white paint to give a normal appearance. You can then paint decorate the interior any way you want after that. I haven't gone that far myself, though I'd like to in the future.  

 

Another way to light proof is to use tinfoil/ Aluminum foil, but I haven't done that myself. I prefer to use paint. 

Edited by gavino200
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28 minutes ago, James-SNMB said:

For sure. It can (and will) be an iterative process. I can't expect to nail it first try, so I might as well throw something out there and see how it looks rather than trying to make it perfect out of the gate. The latter approach would be more in line with my natural character, but it can be restrictive where I'd benefit from a "learn by doing" approach. And l'll have to balance that against the considerations that I'll have to make if "I might have to open this again later" until I get the hang of what works and what doesn't. Lots to think about (my favourite aspect of the hobby, fortunately).

 

Besides, it will be better to stare at (and play with) a layout that's less than perfect than nothing at all. I can always change it later.

 

I agree. You learn every time you do one of these lighting jobs. I agree with Jeff about tuning down the brightness level. Almost any building will glow if you turn the brightness up enough. 

 

The trick is to add enough resistance to turn down the brightness. On ebay you can get a resister packet something like this. The resistors you'll want tend to be somewhere between 1K and 10K depending on the voltage of your power supply. A lower voltage power supply is better as LEDs don't need much juice. Set up the LEDs. The building will probably glow. Then keep increasing the resistance until the building no longer glows. Then solder that resistor into your circuit.

 

I've sped this process up a bit. I have a little board with a 1K resistor and a potentiometer (variable resistor/dimmer switch) on it. I connect up the board to the power supply and the building with the LEDs. Then I use the knob on the potentiometer to until I like the brightness level and the building doesn't glow. Then I use a multimeter to measure the total resistance. After that, I select the nearest resistor from my box'o'resistors, and wire it in. 

 

It sounds like bit of a process, but it's not so tough to do, and you'll be happy every time you look at your non-glowing buildings. 

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James-SNMB

That sounds like a good process. I haven't looked into resistors yet, but the led strip lighting I bought has a dimmer, and I picked up a multimeter, so I'm definitely keeping that option open if the LEDs I have are too bright.

 

I'm (very slowly) putting together a Faller building kit and have spent a surprising amount of time brushing on primer and painting the inside black (no airbrush for me, and outdoor spray painting wouldnt work in the winter months here). The bare plastic glowed real bad when I held it up to any amount of light. The primer helped a bit, but the differrence the black paint made was really impressive. I think I was incorrect to assume all colours of primer and paint would be similarly opaque!

 

I fully intend to spend the time getting my kits just right, but for some of the pre-built Tomix, Kato and eBay building I have, I think I'll just run an LED strip up the middle for now and leave it until I decide to tackle those projects in more depth.

 

It will take me a solid decade at my current pace with all the building kits I have on hand. I'm in no hurry, and I will ultimately take the time to do it right. But that video made me realize that a few intermediate half measures will make things more fun in the meantime until I have time for "perfect".

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14 minutes ago, James-SNMB said:

That sounds like a good process. I haven't looked into resistors yet, but the led strip lighting I bought has a dimmer, and I picked up a multimeter, so I'm definitely keeping that option open if the LEDs I have are too bright.

 

Don't worry about adding resistors if you need to. It's not a difficult process. You could start a thread in the structure forum and lots of people here will be able to guide you through it. I have no technical background, and I learned the process from scratch quite recently with guidance from people here. I'm pretty sure I could explain it without using a single technical term. I remember I was quite nervous about this. I wanted to do a good job without burning out my LEDs. 

 

 

Quote

 

I'm (very slowly) putting together a Faller building kit and have spent a surprising amount of time brushing on primer and painting the inside black (no airbrush for me, and outdoor spray painting wouldnt work in the winter months here). The bare plastic glowed real bad when I held it up to any amount of light. The primer helped a bit, but the differrence the black paint made was really impressive. I think I was incorrect to assume all colours of primer and paint would be similarly opaque!

 

Ah, yes. The first time I lit a building I tried to lightproof with white paint. It eventually worked, but I must have applied like about ten coats. I might as well have used plaster. 

 

Quote

 

I fully intend to spend the time getting my kits just right, but for some of the pre-built Tomix, Kato and eBay building I have, I think I'll just run an LED strip up the middle for now and leave it until I decide to tackle those projects in more depth.

 

Good idea. Take it step by step.

 

Quote

 

It will take me a solid decade at my current pace with all the building kits I have on hand. I'm in no hurry, and I will ultimately take the time to do it right. But that video made me realize that a few intermediate half measures will make things more fun in the meantime until I have time for "perfect".

 

Tell me about it. I have a zillion unassembled building kits.......and I still can't stop buying them!!!

Edited by gavino200
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James-SNMB
57 minutes ago, gavino200 said:

 

Tell me about it. I have a zillion unassembled building kits.......and I still can't stop buying them!!!

So you're saying there's no hope for me either, but at least I'm not alone! Might as well make that the forum slogan.

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LOL james, you are in a 12 step program here for too many toys like the rest of us!

 

the little variable resistors {pots) are a great solution to figure out brightness needed later once all wired and assembled. you can wire them with a fixed resistor in serial that will limit the current to the max the led can handle so if you turn the pot full on it wont blow your led, then as you turn the pot resistance up the led brightness goes down.

 

+ ------Fixed Resistor (like 100 ohm for 5v power supply) ----- Variable Resistor ---------------

power                                                                                                                                                  LED

- ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

dirt simple to wire and cheap. 2K pot is usually good range

 

https://www.ebay.com/itm/303978641997?hash=item46c689fa4d:g:0QoAAOSwXq5ZqRgt

 

little blank printed circuit boards make it easy. you can cut them up as needed with a razor or hack saw (but use bloves as the dust can irritate your skin when sawing).

 

https://www.ebay.com/itm/193934809161?hash=item2d276a5849:g:CioAAOSwKThgQMYR

 

More dim leds are better and blank off some areas so not every window is lit up. all depends on how much you want to get into lighting.

 

Another thought is to put a quick coat of white over the black then as it makes the reflected light better in the room for more diffuse lighting and we are use to seeing white or light walls in the windows of buildings, not black.

 

cheers

 

jeff

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This chap is scratch building Yufuin station on the Kyudai Honsen. A nice channel to follow with some very good modelling.

 

 

Another with an HO version of Orio station on the Kagoshima Honsen. Having lived in Orio a few years ago, the station looked like this until it’s more recent overhaul. The new station building has been built with retro styling from the original building but the Wakamatsu line, shown in this video, is now a raised station and track using 819系 stock. The overhead wires terminate at Orio.

 

 

Edited by Kamome
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The Yufuin station is simply amazing! Look at all that hard and accurate work that goes into the building, even adding resistors to make the lighting look realistic! The weathering is also perfectly done, very nice!

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He gives the dimensions in this video which 2 ft x 5.90 feet. I like the back station.

 

 

Edited by bill937ca
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36 minutes ago, bill937ca said:

He gives the dimensions in this video which 2 ft x 5.90 feet. I like the back station.

 

1800mm x 600mm for those of you preferring metric measurements. Cool little layout.

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He says the curves are R243 and R280, but that doesn't seem to fit on 1800 x 600.  I think the yard turnouts might be R140 and therefor non-operational.  Why the Kato power pack?

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  • bill937ca changed the title to Model Train City (Spectacular Night Layout)

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