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N-Gauge Japanese Inglenook/Modular Layout


AMoonRabbit

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AMoonRabbit

Hi all,

 

Since my trip to Japan last October, and my purchase of a second hand Tomix C62, my collection has expanded quite a bit. I've seen what a lot of Japanese layouts and would like to create something of my own. I love how modular layouts look with scenic sections that can be moved about and connected whereever and thought that might be a good idea, inspiration drawn from http://www.jmra.gr.jp/shinohara/shino106.html. So initially to start off, my first little project would ideally be something with some operational value, steam era, and the inglenook concept fits best with small spaces. I am thinking a small rural station through line, with a small yard with 3 sidings to allow for sorting and shunting. My track system will be tomix finescale, I currently have the basic loop, and passing loop packs, so have 2 of the 3 points I require. I am mulling over a doubleslip for the 3rd to add a headshunt/kickback. However, I do not have any rail ends, and have not had any luck finding a store stocking them at a decent price.

 

I need help with ideas on baseboard constructions, as well as potential real life locations that would suit this idea. Does anyone know what the boards are made of in the layouts in the link above? 

 

 

Edited by AMoonRabbit
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Welcome rabbit! 
 

Great way to play with small diorama modules and mix and match. 
 

those look to be simple trays. Probably like 1/2” plywood that is framed with some 3/4”x1/4” trim moulding. All of which any lumber yard or big box store would have. Many big box stores will sell a quarter sheet of ply and give 2 free cuts and additional at $1 each to cut the bottom. Moulding can be cut with a hand or razor saw if you do t have access to a shop. Many have just used small wooden tray or wood framed cork bulletin boards for these kinds of module bases. It does lock you into what sizes you can buy though.

 

i know some of the modular stuff early in japan was built around some small plywood boards you could buy cut at a few standard sizes like A4, A3, A2

 

of course cutting those 180 sections will need a saber/jig saw, band saw or scroll saw. Curved ones you can get some veneer tape that is either pressure sensitive adhesive or heat sensitive (you use an iron) to make pretty edges. 

 

cheers,

 

jeff

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AMoonRabbit

Thanks for the welcome Jeff, and the advice. When using ply, would it be an idea to brace it still, or will it be fine with just sealing if each module was 1.5ft by 4ft max?

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It really depends on the quality of the ply. Those modules you linked were like 1.5x2’ max so decent 1/2” ply should stay flat and edge moulding help a bit to stiffen it. Best to paint both sides of the ply Houston use some interior paint) to keep the one side of the ply from getting soaked during scenery stuff and to tom to prevent changes in room humidity from getting in there.

 

for 1.5x4’ I would recommend that you do a small frame under or around the ply. Like 1”-2” x 3/4” and a couple of cross pieces (remember to predrill some holes thru them to run wires, hard to do once they are in place!). You might get away with no warping in a piece of 3/4” ply, but I doubt it. Our clubs last modules were about 1m long and 18” wide and had about 1” tall frame and they stayed nice and flat with a lot of transporting and humidity changes and such. We just used 5mm ply for the top to stay light, if you do a frame you don’t need 1/2”.

 

can you break the big module into two? Smaller you go (especially long runs) the less the chance of a warp happening and the more some simple edge framing may keep it good.

 

yell if you want to chat on designs of frames depending on what tools you have access to and your woodworking experience.

 

cheers

 

jeff

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Love it when thoughts just pop into your head like this! One other solution for modules that would not need much construction would be too look at simple picture frames that have the frame profile you like (there are several different diorama frames in that link). The. Just cut a piece of plywood the size of the glass to replace it. While you would have to use picture frame sizes it’s another way to get around building a module from scratch with mostly premade nice frame work. Just a thought.

 

jeff

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I love inglenooks.

Uncoupling is a must though. Dont want to be doing it by hand, which means changing couplings on rolling stock so bear that in mind.

 

My favourite inglenook ive made was in OO gauge as a 3 track plank with the inglenook essentially hidden in there. 

A 1 piece layout such as this is nice, easy to move around and display rolling stock as a shelf.

This was 1500 long and 250 wide from memory, N gauge would be smaller of course, could do more scenry and still keep it shelf sized. A lot easier to have points motorised too.

Another thing, a 5-3-3 should be a minium for puzzle factor, 3-2-2 Inglenooks are far too easy, a 7-4-4 would be a really good challenge.

 

IMG_20200125_141453.thumb.jpg.0247d623cd6e7da62304790ea8956b74.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

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AMoonRabbit

Thanks Jeff, will certainly consider picture frams too, that's a neat idea actually. 

 

Morcs, you have a point on coupling. I have considered, and looked for the more protipical knuckle couplings, of which Kato do a set? But I haven't come across any. Tomix also have their own rapido couplings with built in magnets, but only on select models. I see Dapol do a set of easy magnet couplings that look like knuckles, perhaps they will fit both my Tomix and Kato stock?

 

I am aiming to make it a 5-3-3 layout, but also will try to accomodate the longest freight stock I have (ワキ5000and コキ5500).

 

The nice thing about the Tomix points is that they have like a small solenoid built in, so they are ready for connecting up to point levers out of the box. 

Edited by AMoonRabbit
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ranger10178
2 hours ago, AMoonRabbit said:

I am aiming to make it a 5-3-3 layout, but also will try to accomodate the longest freight stock I have (フキ5000and コキ5500).

I'm not sure if I'm being an idiot or not... but I can't think what a FuKi5000 is... I know the KoKi5500 are container flats.

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