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Morcs

Any EMU drivers here?

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Morcs

Before the virus I had passed all of the preliminary tests to qualify to train as an EMU driver.

 

Auckland in NZ requires 66 more drivers within the next year for its relatively small city network.

 

I'd like to hear experiences from anyone who has driven EMUs to help my decision.

 

I would be paid very little for almost a year on training, and have to commit for 2 years after that - so a big commitment really.

 

It's 24/7 shift work and final pay is OK but not great. For sure if i was 20 years older, but at only 33 I have some doubts.

 

Driving trains elsewhere in the world with bigger networks and different trains would be far more interesting - Auckland's line is very simple, short with lots of stops, lots of road crossings and only 1 variety of EMU.

 

Cheers

 

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katoftw
Posted (edited)

I dont think age comes in to play. Not sure your thinking on that.

 

Driving a train can be a boring task. It is repeative work. And if your network is small. This could be amplified.

 

Pay stucture and how it effects you personally is not something anyone else but yourself can judge yourself.

Edited by katoftw

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Morcs
23 minutes ago, katoftw said:

I dont think age comes in to play. Not sure your thinking on that.

 

Driving a train can be a boring task. It is repeative work. And if your network is small. This could be amplified.

 

Thats where age comes into play, if i was 10 years from retirement and looking for work, I could see it as an enjoyable and relatively simple way to work out those years.

 

My feeling is still a no unless somebody was going to come along and point out otherwise!

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katoftw

Sorry but driving train is not simple. You are basicly employed under a nation legislation that puts all your passengers and surroundings under your control. Do something majorily wrong, you go to jail for manslaughter. Crazies jump in front of moving trains. A lot of death can swirl around trains and their drivers. The emotional tolls can be huge.

 

If you want simple. Do something else.

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Morcs
Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, katoftw said:

Sorry but driving train is not simple. You are basicly employed under a nation legislation that puts all your passengers and surroundings under your control. Do something majorily wrong, you go to jail for manslaughter. Crazies jump in front of moving trains. A lot of death can swirl around trains and their drivers. The emotional tolls can be huge.

 

If you want simple. Do something else.

A misphrase on my part. I meant in the sense it is mostly under your control, and the same thing everyday, and be able to leave your work at work as as opposed to corporate management roles.

Edited by Morcs

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katoftw

Oh yeah. Not a job you take home with you. Out the gate and forget.

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ranger10178

The other thing to consider though, once you've qualified as a train driver (and served your minimum sentence), you can usually transfer to another railway company which may pay better. Sometimes you just need to learn the routes and the traction upon transfer. Companies often offer incentives to transfer too - one time payments etc.

 

In the UK, most train driver vacancies are advertised for qualified drivers only. Usually people start out on driving suburban trains, then move on to higher speed / freight services as they tend to pay better.

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power tools 23

No, sorry but driving is not sample.
 

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gavino200
On 4/22/2020 at 12:15 AM, Morcs said:

Before the virus I had passed all of the preliminary tests to qualify to train as an EMU driver.

 

Auckland in NZ requires 66 more drivers within the next year for its relatively small city network.

 

I'd like to hear experiences from anyone who has driven EMUs to help my decision.

 

I would be paid very little for almost a year on training, and have to commit for 2 years after that - so a big commitment really.

 

It's 24/7 shift work and final pay is OK but not great. For sure if i was 20 years older, but at only 33 I have some doubts.

 

Driving trains elsewhere in the world with bigger networks and different trains would be far more interesting - Auckland's line is very simple, short with lots of stops, lots of road crossings and only 1 variety of EMU.

 

Cheers

 

 

Why don't you ask the train company if they can arrange for you to talk with one of their drivers. Or if there's a union you could talk with them. Some jobs are tough and carry a lot of responsibility. That's not necessarily a reason not to do it if it interests you. It's a decision that no one can make but you.

 

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katoftw

I am curious to know if this stroy advanced more in the past 3 months.

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Morcs
3 hours ago, katoftw said:

I am curious to know if this stroy advanced more in the past 3 months.

 

No, it didnt. Too many doubts myself for things that I might hope to be OK with, but in reality ill probably be bored with the repeatedness of the route and hate the shift work.

Long distance freight routes through the countryside id probably be OK with, but freight is an entirely different company here, and a lot more limited in number of services / drivers required.

 

In this job climate though its a good option - we've had plenty of pilots whom were laid off getting into train driving.

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Morcs
Posted (edited)
On 4/23/2020 at 12:05 AM, ranger10178 said:

The other thing to consider though, once you've qualified as a train driver (and served your minimum sentence), you can usually transfer to another railway company which may pay better. Sometimes you just need to learn the routes and the traction upon transfer. Companies often offer incentives to transfer too - one time payments etc.

 

In the UK, most train driver vacancies are advertised for qualified drivers only. Usually people start out on driving suburban trains, then move on to higher speed / freight services as they tend to pay better.

Part of the contract is to hold you to 2 years service after becoming qualified - they had had plenty of people going to australia fresh out of the gate for much better $$$ in the past, as it pays OK in NZ, but even experienced i would be on similar money that i was when i was in my late 20s

 

On 7/19/2020 at 6:04 PM, power tools 23 said:

No, sorry but driving is not sample.
 

No its not, but it is in terms of variety and complexity of corporate management and all the baggage that comes with that.

I look at it as more akin to a skill that you hone with practice and experience, and once you are competent, and stay vigilant and focusesed at all times, id say it probably would be relatively simple by then.

Edited by Morcs

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cteno4
37 minutes ago, Morcs said:

No its not, but it is in terms of variety and complexity of corporate management and all the baggage that comes with that.

I look at it as more akin to a skill that you hone with practice and experience, and once you are competent, and stay vigilant and focusesed at all times, id say it probably would be relatively simple by then.


Sorry I don’t agree with you there, from my experience with corporate management it’s not always really that complex or that hard to suss out, just more stomaching how it’s done some of the time and dealing with some of the folks that can be not so honorable or are more looking out for themselves than the job or company. Dealing with corporate types I’ve often wondered how some have got where they were with the talent and brains they have displayed.

 

keeping yourself vigilant and focused As a driver is not so “simple” as it’s always a bit of a complex dance of the situation and not getting lulled into not seeing changes occurring. Doing that flawlessly is not a simple skill. A small screw up by a Corp type may loose some money but probably not a life, but as a driver it easily could so different responsibilities.

 

getting paid poorly during training is understandable as well as requiring 2 years service for the investment in your training cost also understandable. 
 

when you start the job in your life and if it’s what you are interested in doing and you are suited to the job with your potentials and personality is really up to you, there are no external rules on those. I’ve had friends change careers at very odd times and into very different ones and while it would not be my path of choice, but it was wonderful for them.
 

jeff

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gavino200
Posted (edited)
15 hours ago, cteno4 said:


 just more stomaching how it’s done some of the time and dealing with some of the folks that can be not so honorable or are more looking out for themselves than the job or company.

 

 

I'd be willing to bet that's exactly what he's talking about. Any money says that he's looking for something that's simple in terms of politics. I've never seen a work environment that's completely free of politics, but some are notably worse than others. 

 

Is that correct, @Morcs? If so, you might want to state that clearly. Otherwise people are going to be hung up on the term "simple" and take offense. 

Edited by gavino200
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Kiha66
Posted (edited)

I'm friends with a group of younger railroaders, most of whom work for Midwest/eastern lines (CN/NS) and also one who just started as a guard in Melbourne.  People often underestimate how much is going on when running a railroad.  Sure you don't have to steer the train like you would a car, but there are a thousand other things crews have to worry about.  From what I understand from friends in train crew positions many of the issues of the job are not directly related to train driving, but the difficulty of railroad life.  From the ever changing schedule and 12+ hour days, to the constant lack of stability in your daily job and working environment many have found it harder than expected.  In addition management is often fairly harsh on train crews, to the point many seem to feel targeted by their bosses rather than supported.  

 

That said the railroad can be a great career, but you will have little free time and probably miss a lot of social events and hanging out with friends.  Your experience will also vary hugely on what company you work for.  My recommendation to get a better idea of what life as a driver is like would be to contact the union that you'd be a part of, and see if they can connect you with some experienced drivers to answer your questions. 

Edited by Kiha66
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Morcs
On 7/21/2020 at 11:02 AM, gavino200 said:

 

I'd be willing to bet that's exactly what he's talking about. Any money says that he's looking for something that's simple in terms of politics. I've never seen a work environment that's completely free of politics, but some are notably worse than others. 

 

Is that correct, @Morcs? If so, you might want to state that clearly. Otherwise people are going to be hung up on the term "simple" and take offense. 

 

That's correct, simple in terms of politics, and the variables your dealing with predominantly aren't people...

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katoftw
Posted (edited)

That is more of a company question than a railway question.  The railway I work for is full of politics at the staffing level.

 

Old boys whom block training of younger blokes as the old boys dont want others doing their jobs.

 

Management with nil railway operational experience tell employees with 40 years experience how to do their jobs.

 

Heavily unionized with add another dynamic of politics.

 

Or just generally being at the government's control as you are a government contractor, as the government pays the bills.

 

And the you will still have the lunchroom politics cos all the stuff mentioned gets peeps into fights due to the above points.

 

This is the only unionized job I have had. And it is the most political bs job I have had to. I just push it to the side and get on with the job, but it does still rile me up every now and then.

Edited by katoftw
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cteno4

Yep on the non railroad side I’ve worked in companies that had little politics, well managed staff and folks generally happy, productive and folks got along well (inside and outside of work), not a daily fight to the death and worry all night what will happen the next day places. But I’ve seen many that we’re going toward mad Max. 
 

jeff

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JR 500系

I cant provide much advice to you as i have close to zero experience in driving a train (densha de go dont count!), but end of the day, if you are doing a job you like then i guess that's fine. Colleagues and co-workers, along with the working culture play a critical part too, and perhaps your daily commute to the work place should also be considered.  

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