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There is a prototype for everything... (Japan Rail)


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If I recall correctly, it was there before the station and local legend forbade anyone from moving it.  JNR didnt want to change their station plans, so just built platform so the tree would be in the center. When the new elevated station was built, they stuck with tradition and kept the tree in the center of one of the new platforms. 

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6 minutes ago, Kiha66 said:

If I recall correctly, it was there before the station and local legend forbade anyone from moving it.  JNR didnt want to change their station plans, so just built platform so the tree would be in the center. When the new elevated station was built, they stuck with tradition and kept the tree in the center of one of the new platforms. 

It was there, but afaik the line is not a JNR line (it's Keihan). Also there is a legend of misforutne and even illness and death for those who tried to cut it down, so they kept it first for the old station and then the new elevated one.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kayashima_Station

https://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/萱島駅

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JRail modelers

 

"We've seen the weirdest stuff, the most unusual operations and strange compositions. Nothing can surprise us."

 

Hankyu

 

*runs its trains on the tokaido shinkansen*

 

 

http://oimactaka.shumilog.com/2011/06/08/阪急2300系新幹線/

 

http://www20.tok2.com/home/kt2251ex/hankyu-re1.htm

 

https://matome.naver.jp/odai/2141199642149105101

 

Provisional wooden platforms and shelters

http://nakkacho.cocolog-nifty.com/main/2006/11/post_9eb6.html

 

When the Shin-Osaka to Kyoto section of the Tokaido shinkansen was being built in the early 1960, Hankyu's Kyoto Main line was being disturbed by construction works.

Meanwhile, JNR did not have suitable 1435mm gauge rolling stock to test the new line.

 

Therefore an agreement was made between the two companies.

 

Hankyu was thus allowed to use the newly-built section between Oyamazaki and Kanmaki station on regular services at the maximium speed of 110Km/h (the section was provisionally fed at 1500v DC and with, again, provisional color light signalling and connecting tracks and with provisional Oyamazaki, Minase and Kanmaki stations) between the 12th of May 1963 and the 19th of December of the same year, while lending 2300 series set 2371 to JNR to do further tests up or down the new Shinkansen line.

 

This actually made Hakyu Kyoto Line trains the first regular services using the Tokaido Shinkansen.

 

Edited by Socimi
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That feeling when you have to limit the platform length on your layout because of space constraints, but then find out that short four-tracked stations actually exist.

 

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Man, dont you hate it when people paint their models in unrealistic fantasy schemes which never ran on the type?

 

 

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Wait, are those DMUs painted like 12/14 series coaches?

Don't confuse me like this...

Edited by GDorsett
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They are actually 50 series coaches afaik!  I know that feeling, something just seems wrong about the picture!

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Everything about this picture is wrong. They are painted like 12/13 series coaches, and the roofline looks sort of like a 12/13, and the end looks sort of like a 12/13, but it's too square, hence why I figured DMU. That said, there's no cab on the end and no headlights.

Japan, Why!?

Why must you confuse me like this?

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Those are just 50 series coaches painted in Blue Train livery. They were used on the Rapid Kaikyo between Aomori and Hakodate, which was (along with the Hatsukari) a predecessor to the Hakucho limited express services.

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At first I was going to say no as the SL Ginga uses kiha 141 series DMUs as passenger coaches.  Then doing some research it turns out that the 141 series are made from rebuilt ohafu 51 series coaches with kiha 22 drive trains.  So its is possible that some were reused for that purpose after being retired by JR Hokkaido.  However since the 141 series were converted in the early 90s and the Rapid Kaikyo wasn't retired till the early 2000s, I feel they probably were just scrapped upon retirement.

Edited by Kiha66
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I've noticed that the 12/13 series coaches are all chairs, not sleepers. (from what I've seen) I've seen Blue Train sets that include them at one end of the train, but are they designed as chair addons for sleeper rakes or are they designed to run in a rake by themselves as non-sleeper trains, as I've only ever seen one named Blue Train with them in it's rake? (Don't remember the name)

Edited by GDorsett
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The 12 series were designed as daytime coach cars.  When the 20 series sleepers began aging out (and JNR wanted to replace the dedicated power cars on sleeper trains with distributed power so trains could be split more easily) the 14 series were built which had coach sections that look almost identical to the 12 series, which may have been what you saw.  I remember the "Noto" express which ran on the Shinetsu line used a mix of 14 series sleepers and coaches, which may have been the train you were thinking of.

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It probably was the Noto.

So the Blue Trains would still run, but would swap out the sleeper coaches for these daytime chair coaches?

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The idea was that the train would leave from a single station (such as Tokyo), then travel as a single section for much of the route.  At some point it would be cut into two trains and each would end at a different city.  With the 20 series a separate generator car was required for a train so when the train split an extra generator car would have to be added.  The 14 series cars had lots of small generators mounted under multiple cars, so when you split the train each section already had its own power on board.  

The coach cars were just for passengers traveling during the day or for those wishing to save money by avoiding buying a sleeping berth.   They stand out in the 14 series as they don't have the same high roof as the sleeping cars.  The coach sections on the older sleeping trains (like the 20 and 581 series) had high roofs so to keep the same look as the sleeping cars even if the space inside was unused.

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Ah, okay. Makes sense to me.

So if they weren't always used on sleeper trains, were they run in their own trains?

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Yep, they were some of the later JNR (and later JR) loco hauled rolling stock.  There's quite a few pics of them as daytime passenger trains on the shinetsu line.

 

A 14 series train pulled by an EF62 somewhere near Toyono just before the Nagano Shinkansen opened and loco hauled trains were retired.
http://home.f08.itscom.net/shoukei/040511.jpg 

 

From this page of Shinetsu line photos
http://home.f08.itscom.net/shoukei/shinetsu.htm

Edited by Kiha66
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Alright, cool. Thank you!

Still think I'll turn my set into an HO version of the Kinokuni since I can't find any more intermediate cars...

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