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disturbman

Cooking...

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disturbman

I'm intended this thread to be about cooking, maybe exchanging recipes if anyone is interesting.

 

But, first thing first, I would like to ask if someone, maybe someone with deep connection with Japan, can give me the real Okonomiyaki recipe. I tried some but I never achieved real greatness and I muss confess, I really love this stuff and would be happy to eat more of it.  :cool: :cool: :cool:

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CaptOblivious

You and me both!

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Guest ___

Man, I love, Okonomiyaki. Last time I had it I was on a lovely date w/ Yumiko-Chan in Osaka.

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grumbeast

Excuse my ignorance, but what is it?

 

G.

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alpineaustralia
Excuse my ignorance, but what is it?

 

I assume you mean Okonomiyaki rather than Yumiko-Chan

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disturbman

What it is? It's delicious.  :grin

 

It's a kind of Japanese pancake, it has its origin in the Kansai region. The name means "everything that you want". Usually in Japan, when you get to a restaurant, they bring you the paste and the ingredients and you have to mix them and cook them yourself. As for myself I discovered it first in Amsterdam, a guy, who had a japanese wife, decided to make an Okonomiyaki only restaurant. But he was cooking them himself. It was very nice to be seated at the counter, you could looked at him and have a nice talk with him. I wonder if the restaurant is still open nowadays.

 

Next time I go to Tokyo I try the Monja.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Okonomiyaki

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disturbman

Ok this thread doesn't get the success it deserves. Let's feed it a little.

 

So today i'm going to share with you my Onion soup receipt. I know, I'm French and I can't help it.

 

Ingredients:

- 1kg white onions (that makes a soup for 4 people)

- 50g butter

- 1 potato

- 1 zucchini (half if it's a big one).

 

Preparations:

1/ Cut the onions - the way you want.

2/ In a pot, smelt the 50 (to 75g) of buter.

3/ Add the onions.

4/ Let them cooked for a while. A low temp or mid temp fire is necessary. If you make the fire two strong you will burn them.

5/ When the onions have reduced to half their initial size add the zucchini and the potato in big pieces.

6/ Add a litter water or so. This can be a litter bouillon.

7/ Add salz and pepper.

8/ After twenty minutes the potato should be cooked. Put a knife into it if it goes through with no problems the soup is cooked.

9/ Use a blender.

10/ Serve and enjoy.

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CaptOblivious

That onion soup sounds tasty. Here's something I cooked up last week that turned out really great (and is a nice nod to my southern Louisiana heritage)

 

(also, don't let the ham hocks put you off: They're crucial!)

 

http://www.gumbopages.com/food/red-beans.html

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disturbman

^^ sounds wonderfull. To bad I have problems to digest hot dishes these days.  :sad:

 

The onion soup was definately tasty and... a beautifull to the mouth. It was like eating sweet silk. Maybe the best soup I ever made... the other contender for greatness being a green curry/red lencils soup (presonnal receipt, never heard of such a thing before).

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CaptOblivious

^^ sounds wonderfull. To bad I have problems to digest hot dishes these days.  :sad:

 

The onion soup was definately tasty and... a beautifull to the mouth. It was like eating sweet silk. Maybe the best soup I ever made... the other contender for greatness being a green curry/red lencils soup (presonnal receipt, never heard of such a thing before).

 

My wife loves green curry: Would you mind sharing the recipe? Sounds tasty!

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Claude_Dreyfus

Shepherds Pie.

 

Okay, I’ll add a recipe on here now, for a traditional UK dish that is a firm favourite. Essentially this is two dished, Shepherds Pie has lamb and Cottage Pie has beef. This is my twist on this recipe, and must work; I haven’t poisoned anyone with it yet! :grin

 

The volumes given here will make a pie that is generous for two, but probably a stingy for four. These measurements are based on judgement, so it may call for some trial and error.

 

Filling

 

12oz Minced Beef or Lamb

1 Onion – pealed and chopped

1 Carrot – pealed, chopped and par-boiled.

 

Directions

 

Fry the mince until half cooked, then add the chopped Onion. Once both cooked, add carrot. I use a wok for this.

 

Once these based ingredients are cooked it’s time for the ‘additionals’:

 

½ pint gravy (you will need this)

½ cup of veg stock (useful for flavour)

Herbs – depending on the meat:

Rosemary, mint and thyme for the lamb

Sage and thyme for beef

A dash of red wine

A generous splash of Worcester Sauce (although this is probably not readily available outside of the UK). For me it is this that gives the pie its ‘zing’!

A nice dollop of Sambal – this is my twist as Shepherds/Cottage Pie is not necessarily spicy.

Black pepper; you can also add salt, but I don’t tend to…

 

All these can be added to provide extra depth to the flavour.

 

When added simmer the mixture for about 20 minutes to reduce and thicken.

 

Topping:

 

2 baking potatoes

Large knob of butter

Decent splash of olive oil

Sprinkling of basil

½ tablespoon of parmesan cheese

Pinch of back pepper

 

Peel, chop and boil the potatoes

 

Once soft, drain the potatoes and mash. Add the butter for flavour and the olive oil for additional moisture – mashed potato can be very dry. Throw in the basil and cheese, then stir thoroughly. You can be very generous with the oil and add more if the mixture seems too dry and starts to clog. Be careful not to make it too wet though. The mash should be smooth and without lumps.

 

Completion

 

Add the filling mixture to a baking dish, then add the mash on top. Don’t mix…

 

Sprinkle a generous helping of grated cheese to the top, preferably cheddar.

 

If eating immediately, place under the grill for a few minutes to melt and brown the grated cheese. If having later it can be stored for a couple of days in the fridge, the ovened for about 20-30 minutes at 180 degrees c.

 

Lovely

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CaptOblivious

I love cottage pie! (I love shepherd's pie too, but minced lamb is nearly impossible to find in the US!) My wife Amy makes it from a recipe we found in Australia that is very tasty (uses tomatoes in the filling to give it a nice acidic kick).

 

A few questions: What is gravy? Is Worcestershire Sauce (readily available in the US) the same as Worcester Sauce? What is Sambal? Is that like Thai red pepper sauce?

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Claude_Dreyfus

I love cottage pie! (I love shepherd's pie too, but minced lamb is nearly impossible to find in the US!) My wife Amy makes it from a recipe we found in Australia that is very tasty (uses tomatoes in the filling to give it a nice acidic kick).

You can add tomatoes to the filling....does add another dimension to the flavour.

A few questions: What is gravy?

Essentially it was traditionally the juices from the meat, thickened with something like cornflour. You get granules in the UK; Bistow are a popular brand; ideal with your Sunday Roast dinner...

Is Worcestershire Sauce (readily available in the US) the same as Worcester Sauce?

The same....an essential in my kitchen finding its way into almost everything. P.S. I do almost all the cooking at home...

What is Sambal? Is that like Thai red pepper sauce?

It is a chilli paste originating from Indonesia. Very popular in Holland, and available in the UK. It can be very fierce, so needs handling with care.... :blob8:

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Martijn Meerts

Sambal is great, but the store bought stuff isn't very spicy.. Depending on what you're used to anyway.. I can easily eat a tablespoon of the stuff without really noticing much.

 

There's a lot of chinese restaurants in The Netherlands, some of which make the sambal themselves. That's already much better.

 

However, a friend of my sister is Indonesian. His mother makes her sambal herself, and my sister often gets some of that. Now THAT is the real stuff =)

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disturbman

Hum... gravy. It reminds me that I found a place where they had Poutine, this Quebecian dish made out of fries, gravy and cheese. Could have been good if only the cheese had taste. I will recommand raclette cheese for that, not chedar (that ain't no cheese, just fermented milk).

 

My wife loves green curry: Would you mind sharing the recipe? Sounds tasty!

 

I don't mind. Let me regroup and I will share it with you.

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bill937ca

Hum... gravy. It reminds me that I found a place where they had Poutine, this Quebecian dish made out of fries, gravy and cheese. Could have been good if only the cheese had taste. I will recommand raclette cheese for that, not chedar (that ain't no cheese, just fermented milk).

 

 

They really should use cheese curds which is somewhat salty and would give the poutine more flavour.

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Darren Jeffries

Ok, I'll chip in with a very easy dish to just "stick in the oven" when you have little time (or are too tired to do anything more complicated).

 

This is my famous Phili-Chicken!!!!

 

You will need the following (Multiply the ingredients for the amount of people you are cooking for):

 

1 fresh chicken portion - this needs to be a leg or something else that has the skin remaining. Chicken breasts dont work.

Philidelphia or other Cream Cheese.

3 rashers of Unsmoked back bacon.

 

Take a fresh chicken portion and make a small slit in the top of the chickin skin. Put around a dessert spoon size amount of Cream Cheese inside the skin and spread as well as you can under the skin without breaking it away from the meat. use a cocktail stick or cooking pin to pin the skin closed. lightly brush the skin with oil and season to your taste with Salt & Pepper and herbs of your choice. Place in a baking dish (i find a pyrex glass dish best) and place in the oven on 180degrees (or the equivilant Gas mark) for 30 minutes.

 

Remove the chicken from the oven and remove the pins/cocktail sticks. Be careful here as the chicken and cheese will be very hot!!! Tightly wrap the rashers of bacon around the chicken, making sure to cover the opening in the skin. Replace back in the oven for a further 20 minutes.

 

Serve with your favourite vegetables and voila!

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disturbman

I feel fat just by reading your recipe Darren... Sounds yummy. ^^

 

I still didn't get time to gathered my mind about the Red Linsen/Green Curry Soup but I do have another soup recipe to share. This one can be made out of carrots or pumpkin and is very tasty. Pretty sure Don's wife will love it.

 

Ingredients:

- 1kg of carrots or pumpkin

- (1 carrot for the pumpkin version)

- 1 big onion

- 2 medium potatoes

- salz and pepper

- small can of coconut milk

- green curry

 

Directions:

- mince the onion and chop the vegetables.

- in a pot, let the onions become yellow in olive oil or butter.

- add the vegetables. Let them cook together for 5 minutes.

- cover with water. Add salz and pepper.

- cook for 20 minutes at medium fire.

- when cooked, add the coconut milk and the green curry.

- mix

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Darren Jeffries

I feel fat just by reading your recipe Darren... Sounds yummy. ^^

 

Yes, not for calorie watchers!!!

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CaptOblivious

Green curry and pumpkin? Not quite my cup of tea, but my wife would indeed go nuts for that…I'll be sharing that one with her :D

 

I feel fat just by reading your recipe Darren... Sounds yummy. ^^

 

I still didn't get time to gathered my mind about the Red Linsen/Green Curry Soup but I do have another soup recipe to share. This one can be made out of carrots or pumpkin and is very tasty. Pretty sure Don's wife will love it.

 

Ingredients:

- 1kg of carrots or pumpkin

- (1 carrot for the pumpkin version)

- 1 big onion

- 2 medium potatoes

- salz and pepper

- small can of coconut milk

- green curry

 

Directions:

- mince the onion and chop the vegetables.

- in a pot, let the onions become yellow in olive oil or butter.

- add the vegetables. Let them cook together for 5 minutes.

- cover with water. Add salz and pepper.

- cook for 20 minutes at medium fire.

- when cooked, add the coconut milk and the green curry.

- mix

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disturbman

Goes very well together... but if you prefer you can do it with carrots instead.

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sharrywon

Just try this way.....

• Okonomiyaki Flour 100g

• Water (or Chicken stock) 160ml

• Eggs (or Egg substitute) 2 (or 120ml)

• Cabbage, cut into 3cm x 2-3ml strips 300g

• Green Onions, thinly sliced diagonally 2 stalks

• Tenkasu (Tempura bits) 30g

• Bacon, cut into 8cm (3") pieces 6 strips

• Raw shrimp cut into approx 1cm (1/2") chunks 100g

• Bonus: Chinese sausage, cut diagonally 1-2 links

• Bonus: Beni Shoga (Pickled Ginger) 30g

TOPPINGS

• Kewpie Mayonnaise

• Okonomi Sauce

• Aonori (Seaweed Flakes)

• Katsuobushi (Bonito Flakes)

 

PREPARATION:

• In a large bowl, whisk together Okonomiyaki Flour and Water until smooth

• Add Eggs, Cabbage, Onions, Tenkasu, Ginger, Shrimp and Sausage and mix, but don't over mix.

• Oil a griddle that has been heated to 200C (400F) and add Okonomiyaki mixture divided into two pancakes.

• Using a spatula flattens and form pancakes until around 1.5cm (3/4") thick - approximately 30cm (12") across.

• Add Bacon pieces to cover top of each pancake.

• After about 3 minutes, flip over pancake (bacon side down) and cook for 4 minutes.

• Flip pancake again (bacon side up) and cook for 3 minutes or until firm and well browned.

• Remove to plate and drizzle with Kewpie mayonnaise, okonomi sauce and sprinkle with Aonori and Katsuobushi.

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Dani

I love this thread!!!!!

 

I use to make sushi and sukiyaki, first one in summer and last one in winter. I could survive all year only eating those two dishes.  :grin

 

19980_1365889592163_7200118_n.jpg

 

But I turned sushi in a Spanish way, so I use local ingredients developing my own recipes like "Jamon and Spanish omelette" makis and so...

 

797_1058769474352_42_n.jpg

44267_1658978399200_2692575_n.jpg

 

And I want to share with you my favourite sushi, it isn't my invention, but I do it often:

 

31615_1452756003769_2508576_n.jpg

 

From outside to inside: omelette, rice, nori, Philadelphia cheese, Piquillo peppers and chives.

 

いただきます!!!

 

Dani.

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