Jump to content

JR 205 ex Nambu Line 南武線 In Indonesia


Fasubkhanali (Ali)

Recommended Posts

Fasubkhanali (Ali)

Hello... My name is Ali and I'm from Jakarta, Indonesia.

 

A few months ago, 54 units of JR 205 ex Nambu Line came to Indonesia. All units have been tested. There are NaHa 2, 4, 7, 8, 11, 35, 40, 41, 44.

 

I have some photos and videos (videos in My Youtube Channel ). Please subscribe me in Youtube  :)

 

Some Photo of JR 205 南武線 in Jakarta (Photo taken by me)

 

11062546_10204053152479900_5117714098770

 

11139386_10204043743484681_1796657613251

 

11826069_10203932745149792_6628370322951

 

11796198_10203918272907995_7038046059543

 

11826058_10203916632186978_5980892504635

 

11038385_10203758919444258_1965122113739

 

DSCF9688.jpg

 

(NaHa 44 + NaHa 2 = 12 Cars)

Edited by Fasubkhanali (Ali)
  • Like 8
Link to post

That's pretty insane! I think a 12-car formation is the longest formation the 205 Series have ever been in, with 11-cars (Yamanote line) being the longest up until now. Very very cool. I think I need to visit Indonesia some time...

Link to post
Fasubkhanali (Ali)

That's pretty insane! I think a 12-car formation is the longest formation the 205 Series have ever been in, with 11-cars (Yamanote line) being the longest up until now. Very very cool. I think I need to visit Indonesia some time...

Yeah I know. Some japan railfan tell that they're jealous because never seen JR 205 in 12 cars.

 

I'll very happy if you come to Indonesia :) 

Link to post

I'll very happy if you come to Indonesia :)

 

I'll announce it wide and broad on the forums! I have a lot of research to do for (potential) 'business' projects! ;)

  • Like 1
Link to post

Hi Ali,

 

very nice photo collections...  :) I wish in the future the E231-500 will enter service here too.. LoL..

 

Tony, sure it will be great to do the research here.. will wait for your news though.. :)

Link to post

Well, sadly some of our fellow modeller doesn't like if a foreigner make Indonesian prototype model train..

Then I sincerely urge them to do it by themselves. Nationalism doesn't guarantee quality. Not at all. ;)

  • Like 1
Link to post

Agreed. But the other fellow always complained about the price from the local model builder, lol.

 

Rupiah's exchange rate is also falling down too fast..

 

I'm personally don't really care about this.i buy what I like, I build what I like.

Edited by HantuBlauLOL
  • Like 1
Link to post

Luckily we also realise this and want to produce at the lowest cost possible, so we can sell for reasonable prices as well. Then again, nationalists don't do reasoning much, so they will always have something to complain about and shove off to foreigners. ^^

Link to post

Interesting view coming from a nation full of sweat shops paying chump wages and exports products all across the globe.  But they don't like imports?

Edited by katoftw
Link to post

Because our government imported so many stuffs, and they told us not to import stuffs. They are so ... I don't like them.

 

And rupiah's exchange rate falls so deep because of that

Link to post

The main reason why retired trainsets from Japan can go to Indonesia is that Indonesia extensively uses 1067 mm gauge tracks, the most commonly-used railroad gauge in Japan. As such, the 205's can be shipped to Indonesia for use there with minimal modifications.

Link to post
Fasubkhanali (Ali)

The main reason why retired trainsets from Japan can go to Indonesia is that Indonesia extensively uses 1067 mm gauge tracks, the most commonly-used railroad gauge in Japan. As such, the 205's can be shipped to Indonesia for use there with minimal modifications.

That's true. And another reason why Indonesia buy some retired trainset from Japan because more cheap than buy new train. Retired trainsets from Japan have a good quality to operate again in Indonesia.

Link to post
SuRoNeFu 25-501

It seems that former Nambu Line 205 series trains in Indonesia would still have much of its original "Tri-Color" livery (yes, this is my personal term for livery being applied on Nambu Line trains after the introduction of 205 series trains back in the 1989) for now, due to some problems occurred behind the scene (which prevents KAI Commuter Jabodetabek to recoloring the train into the corporate colors).

 

Interestingly enough, from 20 trainsets imported to Indonesia, a large number of those trains would be former Yamanote Line trainsets that purchased during the last years of JNR era (as identified by the presence of foldable stairs right after the driver-side cab door, parts of interior, small door windows, and so on), which reveals the fact that 205 series trains were in fact a derivative of 201 series trains (FYI)...

Link to post
SuRoNeFu 25-501

So two 6 car units coupled together?

Yes. Two 6-car trains are coupled together. However, there are some effects on operating 12-car trains:

 

1. Stations that not ready for handling 12-car trains are required to have the platform being extended, to accommodate 12-car trains

2. Overhead line voltage that normally stays on 1.5kV DC suddenly drops when the 12-car train passes a section, affecting trains that running directly in front of it (as well as behind it).

 

The first one has been solved (though it is currently still in progress), by performing platform extension work on most of stations on Bogor Line (yes, 12-car trains are currently limited to Bogor - Jakarta Kota corridor, which is sometimes referred as Bogor Line).

 

However, for the second one, it is a big problem, since most of substations that serves Bogor Line are only capable to handle up to 10-car trains (though 12-car trains are barely capable to be handled by the substations, but it caused overhead line to suffer voltage drop). So the company decided to lengthening the distance between the 12-car train and trains that running right in front of or behind it, to keep the overhead line voltage stays at 1.5kV. This solution is successfully preventing the other trains to be affected by voltage drop, but it is only for temporary period, as the company is still searching the best way for keeping the stability of overhead line voltage (as it tends to cause delays on affected sections).

 

CMIIW

Link to post

Hmm... I have heard before of problems when trains were using more electric current than substations could provide, but does that relate to the fact that it is 'only' 1.5 kV? In the Netherlands we also use 1.5 kV and there are frequent train services (busiest parts every ~5 minutes a train per direction) with train lengths up to 12 cars. Rather, don't they also do so in Japan? Just look at the Yamanote Line (11 cars) that is electrified with 1.5 kV and runs with 2.5 minute headways during rush hours. I'm no expert in this field, but it doesn't make sense to me that 1.5kV could be such a limiter.

Link to post

The total power = current * voltage. If the current is not enough then the voltage drops. The current carrying capacity depends on the substations and the cables and you have to upgrade one or both of them to double the maximal amount or current. Even the Tokaido line has a current limit and there were some locomotives that actually overloaded even that. (it's enough for roughly 24 car commuter trains) Btw. the same problem happened with the first 101 series train on the yamanote line and the quick solution was to limit the current draw of the test train, which is limited the acceleration but allowed time for upgrading the line. This would be a viable option for the 205 series, but it would slow down the whole timetable, which could actually decrease the capacity of the line. Third option is more efficient traction systems, but that is not possible here.

  • Like 1
Link to post

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...